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Welcome to The CITE -- a blog on Course materials, Innovation, and Technology in Education, created by Mark Nelson and now part of the Publications Department of the National Association of College Stores. CITE is a pun with multiple meanings - referring to cite as in citation, something people reference; site as in location, website, or place people go to; and sight as in foresight or looking ahead to what is coming. Comments, discussion, feedback and ideas are welcome.



Friday, December 19, 2014

P-Commerce Lets Local Stores Back in Game

Smartphones may prove to be an Achilles’ heel for Amazon, in the view of a columnist for The New York Times. At the same time, smartphones might be a lifeline for local retailers, including those on or near college campuses.

“Like many of the local and big-box retailers it has displaced over the last decade and a half, Amazon could itself become increasingly vulnerable to the threat of technological upheaval,” wrote Farhad Manjoo.

The “upheaval” is the rapidly rising trend of shopping by phone. Obviously, consumers have been able to shop online from their computers for a couple decades now, but the ubiquity of smartphones means a lot of people have fast, private access to e-commerce all the time, no matter where they are.

The thing is, Manjoo noted, all those phone shoppers aren’t necessarily going to Amazon. Physical retail chains, as well as local mom-and-pop stores, have ramped up their website features, added more merchandise, and trimmed their prices.

They’ve also plugged into ordering and courier services such as Postmates and Instacart. Consumers can just as easily browse and purchase from local merchants, often with same-day delivery or pickup, as they can with Amazon.

“None of these technologies pose an existential threat to Amazon, but by giving physical stores some of the conveniences that Amazon has long had, they may limit its potential reach,” Manjoo said.

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Tech Tools Pull Students into Learning

Newer technologies that can be adapted for educational purposes will enable higher education institutions to engage students more deeply in 2015 and help them get more out of their studies, in the view of Kyle Bowen, director of education technology services for Penn State University.

In an interview with Campus Technology, Bowen pointed to video production and networked 3-D printing as examples of the type of technologies schools should be exploring. “Some of the newer technologies, or even technologies that have been around for a while, are beginning to mainstream in ways that are helping us extend learning beyond the class,” he said. “We are starting to see a generation of tools, practices, and spaces to support this, and that’s where our opportunity is.”

Bowen said Penn State set up a One Button Studio, a self-service video production space where students can record anything they want onto a mobile drive—such as presentations, performances, creative film projects, or demonstrations—without worrying about technical aspects. Penn’s networked series of 3-D printers enables students to create and print projects much faster.

Among the advantages of using these technologies for academic work is that they allow faculty “to reclaim time in their classes—time they can recover from less efficient practices and reallocate it to teaching,” Bowen said.

Looking ahead to the new year, Bowen anticipated a rise in the use of digital badges and portfolios to recognize mastery of academic content. That will coincide with institutions offering shorter, more condensed courses, a trend that’s likely to affect course materials as well.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Faculty Need Incentives for Technology

You might wonder why higher education institutions don’t integrate new media and interactive technologies into instruction more extensively. It turns out, according to a new report by not-for-profit consultant Ithaka S+R, that college professors are like the rest of us: They’re busy with ongoing responsibilities (like teaching, research, and working on publications) and don’t have time to mess around with new tech without a darn good reason.

The report, Technology-Enhanced Education at Public Flagship Universities: Opportunities and Challenges, is based on interviews with 214 administrators and department chairs at 10 of the 17 large schools in the Public Flagships Network consortium.

“In an environment featuring more technology-enhanced education, faculty members are constantly trying to balance their responsibilities to undergraduate teaching with requirements from their institutions that they remain active in research,” said the report. “Time is the greatest barrier preventing faculty from experimenting more with technological enhancements to their teaching.”

However, the report also noted, dangling a carrot can work wonders in encouraging faculty to use technology tools in their instruction. For instance, at campuses where academic departments receive at least a portion of fees for online courses, instructors put more time and effort into developing such courses.

The report recommended that institutions “more clearly communicate to students and faculty the value of technology-enhanced education” and provide more tangible incentives to faculty to explore technology for classroom teaching. That includes collaborating with colleagues on their own campus as well as at other schools—something that faculty are typically reluctant to do, the report said.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Integrating Smartphones into the Classroom

Smartphones can be valuable tools in the classroom, if teachers find the right way to use them. Unfortunately, the devices can’t be controlled the way textbook content can be.

Solutions range from the total bans on cellphones in the classroom to allowing students to use their smartphones as they please. Some instructors use social media to engage their students, but blogger Dexter McMillan suggests the technology has turned teachers into advertisers competing for consumers’ attention.

“Teachers are selling a product, knowledge, to their students—much of which has no interest or practical use to the majority of students,” he wrote. “Teachers are advertisers selling the most undesirable product on Earth: History. Math. Grammar.”

Teachers used to be able to stand in front of a class and lecture, but technology has created a more collaborative style of instruction that isn’t solely measured by grades. McMillan wrote that teachers need to reclaim that content control with more and better tools.

“Without control of these devices, technology will not be able to move the classroom experience forward in a significant or profound way,” he said. “Grumpy cat, sports highlights, and pictures from the party on the weekend will continue to dominate classroom attention.”

Monday, December 15, 2014

Study Looks at MOOC Completion Rates

There’s been no shortage of reports on low completion rates for massive open online courses (MOOCs), but maybe the critics are looking at it the wrong way. Harvard researcher Justin Reich thinks so and conducted a study to understand why people take MOOCs in the first place.

Nearly 80,000 people taking one of nine MOOCs offered by Harvard responded to Reich’s survey about their goals. He sorted the respondents into categories—completers, auditors, browsers, and unsure—and found that 19.5% of the respondents who intended to complete the course did finish. Just 5.4% of the respondents who never intended to complete the MOOC in the first place actually made it to the end.

The study wasn’t conducted to convince the critics, but to find distinctions among people who take MOOCs.

“If researchers can discern how many students leave MOOCs because of life’s other commitments, it might help estimate a reasonable ceiling on retention rates in voluntary, free, and open online courses,” Reich wrote. “Further, uncovering how many students leave because they are dissatisfied with a course might better estimate the MOOC attrition levels that course developers could realistically address through better instructional design.”

Friday, December 12, 2014

List Ranks Affordable Online Degrees

It’s the end of the year and time for Top 10 lists. This one, from College Choice, ranks the most affordable online colleges for a bachelor’s degree.

Brigham Young University-Idaho, Rexburg, tops the list, which is based on the total cost to earn the online degree. The cost of tuition at BYU-Idaho is $125 for each credit earned, with Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS, second at $186.50 per tuition credit.

The schools were ranked by tuition per credit for the typical 120-credit requirement at most institutions. Information was gathered from school websites and other publicly available sources. The ranking also includes fees that were readily available on the websites.

“When considering where one can obtain an online bachelor’s degree that will work within a budget, this list will provide a definitive guide to figuring total costs,” Katie Amondson, editor of the ranking, told eCampus News.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

No-Pay Way to an MBA

A master’s of business administration (MBA) can cost nearly $170,000 from a prestigious institution, such as the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. A former Philadelphia schoolteacher has created a way around that.

No Pay MBA is a blog and website where users can find a collection of massive open online courses (MOOCs) focused on an MBA-track of study organized into three semesters. The courses are taught by some of the top business professors from around the world and are offered by the online-learning platforms edX, Coursera, Open2Study, and Udacity.

While the courses are free, there’s also no degree at the end of the road. Several of the MOOC platforms do offer certificates of completion for a small fee.

“There is a great potential for someone to create an alternative, especially for that segment of the market which is already working and doesn’t want to spend what business school costs, and doesn’t necessarily need the launchpad that business schools offer because they’re already midstream in their careers,” said Laurie Pickard, who created the website while working as a development and entrepreneurship specialist for the U.S. Agency for International Development in Rwanda. 

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Free 3-D Printing Curriculum Available

A U.S. manufacturer of 3-D printers has created a customizable 3-D printing curriculum for instructors teaching science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. The 14-week course provides educators with supporting presentations, 3-D models, and grading tools that can be continuously refreshed.

Best of all, the courses from Stratasys Ltd. are free.

Materials for the semester-long college course are downloadable and designed to help instructors prepare their students for careers using 3-D printing technology. The first course, Introduction to 3-D Printing: From Design to Fabrication, familiarizes students with the history of 3-D printing and its applications, while providing hands-on experience in design. Two more courses are planned, covering material memory, multimaterial use, and 3-D printing for robotics.

“The introductory materials on 3-D printing that Stratasys offers, from the slide presentations to the videos, were impressive,” Chee Feng Ping, a lecturer at Temasek Polytechnics in Singapore, said in a report in eCampus News. “The students enjoy the hands-on activities, especially the design process with 3-D printing.”

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

CSUN E-Text Initiative Is Helping Students

California State University, Northridge, launched an e-text initiative last year, providing grants to faculty members to produce course materials for tablets and other mobile devices. Since its launch, 70 CSUN faculty members have provided content, as well as workshops and one-on-one support.

The content varies from textbooks (26%) to manuals (48%), companion pieces (22%), and supplemental reading (4%). Materials include interactive activities, images, and audio and video components.

The university estimates the project has saved students $50 per class since it was launched. CSUN statistics also showed that 14% of students will save more than $100 and 23% will save at least $50.

“The e-texts that professors are writing are an extension of what CSUN professors have always poured energy into,” said biology professor Paul Wilson in a report at AmericanTowns.com. “Twenty years ago, the books would have been photocopied. Now, they are released from the constraints of photocopying. They can be rich in multimedia and fun little activities.”

Monday, December 8, 2014

Students Value Online Learning Experience

A majority (68%) of college students think online classes are important to their educational experience and that social media will eventually be required in all classes. They’ve also taken at least one online course, with 42% saying they got better grades in the online class compared to in-person courses.

The study, conducted annually by Wakefield Research for VitalSource Technologies, found that 45% of the students said they didn’t go more than 10 minutes without accessing some form of technology during the school day. However, students may be learning how to regulate their usage as the average time they said they could possibly go without digital interaction increased from 59 minutes in the 2013 study to 64 minutes this year.

Most students (62%) said they have used interactive textbooks and 44% use mobile learning. The report also found that 77% said a professor had used or asked them to use at least one social media site for a class.

“The findings validate students’ dependence on technology to increase their productivity and job prospects in this competitive, globally connected world, while also providing insights into market trends that will affect the next generation of educational technology,” Cindy Clarke, vice president of marketing for VitalSource, said in a report in eCampus News.

Friday, December 5, 2014

States Working on OER Collaborative

Education agencies from 11 states have joined forces to create the K-12 OER Collaborative, a repository of open educational resources. The group is seeking “full-course OER” for English and language arts for all grade levels and mathematics for grades K-11 from developers, which are due by Jan. 9, 2015.

Content is expected to include comprehensive instructional material, activities that allow teachers to differentiate instruction, and assessment capabilities, according to reports. It must align with the Common Core standards and be available for free under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0.

“This is a great project for at least two reasons,” said Randy Dorn, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Washington. “First, it’s going to support local control by empowering districts to adapt the materials to their own community needs. Second, it’s a low-cost and high-quality way to help students meet our state’s learning standards.”

Representatives from Washington, Utah, and Idaho were on the first committee for the initiative. Education agencies from Arizona, California, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, Nevada, Oregon, and Wisconsin are also involved with the project.

Applications for developers are available at http://goo.gl/forms/gohdUxE5Gw.

Thursday, December 4, 2014

A Slower Year for Tablet Sales

This year is proving to be rather flat for tablet computers. A new International Data Corp. (IDC) report predicts growth in shipments of new tablets will fall to 7% in 2014, compared to 52.5% growth just a year ago.

The report said worldwide tablet shipments for 2014 will be 235.7 million units, with Android devices accounting for 67.7% of the total. The iPad comes in at 27.5% and 4.6% of the shipments will be Windows tablets.

“In the early stages of the tablet market, device lifecycles were expected to resemble those of smartphones, with replacement occurring every two or three years,” said Ryan Rieth, program director of the mobile-device trackers at IDC. “What has played out instead is that many tablet owners are holding onto their devices for more than three years and, in some instances, more than four years.”

The pace at which consumers replace their tablets is just one part of the slowdown. The iPad, which has been the industry standard, has seen its sales slip 14% because of competition from dozens of inexpensive Android models. In addition, Apple has failed to make the kinds of upgrades to the device that get people back into a buying mode, according to a report from C/Net.

IDC also reported that PC shipments continue to fall, but at a far slower rate than expected. Total shipments in 2014 will likely be around 306 million units.

“In the best case for PCs, we’d see a significant wave of replacement as users who spent on phones and tablets in recent years decide they really need to update their PC,” said Loren Loverde, vice president of Worldwide PC Trackers. “As younger generations become more mobile and web-oriented, and emerging regions in particular prioritize converged devices (or economy in number of devices to purchase), the PC market will continue to face tough competition and be more focused on replacements, with limited potential for growth.”

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Study Questions Effectiveness of Digital Learning

Many view digital learning as a way to make it easier for students to be more successful while cutting the costs of education at every level.  A new study from the National Education Policy Center, a research institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder, suggested that might not be the case.

The report found that despite all the hype and money spent on digital learning, it rarely improves student outcomes and costs more when it does. By comparing online-only learning with blended-learning methods where students used digital materials to prepare for class, researchers discovered the online-only course had no extra impact on learning. The flipped classroom, did improve learning, but cost more than traditional methods.

“On the whole, it is very difficult to have faith in the path we’re going down,” Noel Enyedy, a researcher from UCLA who helped conduct the study, said in an NPR report.

As one might expect, not everyone agrees with the findings.

“We have the best chance that we’ve ever had to dramatically improve achievement rates for students,” Tom Vander Ark, CEO of Getting Smart and author of Getting Smart: How Digital Learning is Changing the World, told NPR. “That’s me looking through the front windshield. It’s entirely possible to look through the rear windshield as this group did and say, ‘That was dumb, and it didn’t work.’”

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

OER Guidelines under Development

Lumen Learning, which works to expand adoption of open educational resources (OER), is trying to bring a little clarity to the OER conversation. The company is planning to publish a set of guidelines and best practices available for free under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 that is scheduled for release in 2015.

5R Open Course Design Framework will offer training and certification for educators and institutions in building effective OER content. The publication will apply the five R’s—the ability to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute educational content—to designing courses and will provide third-party review of OER courses and programs.

“For any innovation, establishing common practices for consistency and quality is an essential step on the path to achieving widespread adoption,” Cable Green, director of global learning at Creative Commons, said in a report for eCampus News.