Welcome to The CITE -- a blog on Course materials, Innovation, and Technology in Education, created by Mark Nelson and now part of the Publications Department of the National Association of College Stores. CITE is a pun with multiple meanings - referring to cite as in citation, something people reference; site as in location, website, or place people go to; and sight as in foresight or looking ahead to what is coming. Comments, discussion, feedback and ideas are welcome.

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Verso Advertising’s Survey of Book Buying Behavior

Verso Advertising has released the results from the third wave of its Survey of Book-Buying Behavior. The surveys were conducted in November and December 2009, and April 2010. Altogether 9,300 respondents were polled. Some interesting findings from the third wave include:

  • E-reader sales are moving beyond early adopters. Since November, e-reader ownership has increased from 2.9% to 6.8%. However, the number of respondents who said that they are not at all likely to buy an e-reader increased slightly from 49% to 52.2% which suggests limits to e-book penetration.
  • 41.9% of respondents said that they are at least somewhat likely to buy a deluxe edition of a hardcover if it includes a digital version for a modest surcharge.
  • E-reader owners continue to buy print books in addition to e-books. 27.7% of respondents said that they plan to buy 10 or more print books this year and 17.2% are likely to buy five to nine print books. This shows that readers enjoy both formats and a hybrid market is developing.
  • Contrary to popular belief, many young people prefer the bricks and mortar shopping experience. 37% of 18 to 34 year olds said that they prefer to buy books from independent bookstores. In addition, 40% of 18 to 24 years olds said that they visit independent bookstores five or more times a year which is more often than every other age group.

PowerPoint slides of the 2009 findings and 2010 findings are available on the Verso Advertising website.

1 comment:

Bargain Book said...

I saw this being presented at BEA this year and referenced a study at I think Tufts or Penn or some other prestigious university noting that e-books aren't good for deep studying, but can't find the reference. If someone knows please post:
Winston Porter
www.BargainBookMole.org: The Fastest, Easiest (& Free) Way to Dig for the Lowest New & Used Book Prices Online